For the past several years, medical doctors have been repeatedly warned about the dangers of over-prescribing antibiotics. They’ve been told, in medical journals and consumer health magazines, that antibiotics are not effective for colds, upper respiratory infections (URIs), bronchitis or other similar health problems.
That’s not all. They can weaken a person’s natural immune system and their overuse has already lead to the creation of “superbacteria” which is resistant to antibiotic therapy.
Yet, a new report revealed that 44% of children seen by physicians for treatment of common colds still leave doctors’ offices with unnecessary prescriptions for antibiotics!
In addition, 46% of pediatric patients with URIs and 75% of pediatric patients with bronchitis receive antibiotics for their conditions.
Dr. Ann-Christine Nyquist of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver and a multicenter team reported their findings in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

 

They concluded, “Antibiotic prescribing for children diagnosed as having colds, URIs, and bronchitis, conditions that typically do not benefit from antibiotics, represents a substantial proportion of total antibiotic prescriptions to children in the United States each year.”
Among these kids, it’s the youngest who are being pumped with the most drugs. The report noted that children up to four years accounted for 58% of the antibiotic prescriptions.
Instead of “fixing” your kids with pills that don’t work, invest in a health and wellness program instead. Chiropractic care for children can be started immediately after birth, and can help your child stay well for life.
SOURCE: “Table of Antibiotic Prescribing for Children With Colds, Upper Contents Respiratory Tract Infections, and Bronchitis,” Ann-Christine Nyquist, M.D., MSPH; Ralph Gonzales, M.D., MSPH; John F. Steiner, M.D., MPH; Merle A. Sande, M.D., The Journal of the American Medical Association, March 18, 1998.

For the past several years, medical doctors have been repeatedly warned about the dangers of over-prescribing antibiotics. They’ve been told, in medical journals and consumer health magazines, that antibiotics are not effective for colds, upper respiratory infections (URIs), bronchitis or other similar health problems. iStock 000009183310XSmall 300x199 Kids and Colds: Prescribing Unnecessary Antibiotics May Do More Harm Than Good

That’s not all. They can weaken a person’s natural immune system and their overuse has already lead to the creation of “superbacteria” which is resistant to antibiotic therapy.

Yet, a new report revealed that 44% of children seen by physicians for treatment of common colds still leave doctors’ offices with unnecessary prescriptions for antibiotics!

In addition, 46% of pediatric patients with URIs and 75% of pediatric patients with bronchitis receive antibiotics for their conditions.

Dr. Ann-Christine Nyquist of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver and a multicenter team reported their findings in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

They concluded, “Antibiotic prescribing for children diagnosed as having colds, URIs, and bronchitis, conditions that typically do not benefit from antibiotics, represents a substantial proportion of total antibiotic prescriptions to children in the United States each year.”

Among these kids, it’s the youngest who are being pumped with the most drugs. The report noted that children up to four years accounted for 58% of the antibiotic prescriptions.

Instead of “fixing” your kids with pills that don’t work, invest in a health and wellness program instead. Chiropractic care for children can be started immediately after birth, and can help your child stay well for life.

SOURCE: “Table of Antibiotic Prescribing for Children With Colds, Upper Contents Respiratory Tract Infections, and Bronchitis,” Ann-Christine Nyquist, M.D., MSPH; Ralph Gonzales, M.D., MSPH; John F. Steiner, M.D., MPH; Merle A. Sande, M.D., The Journal of the American Medical Association, March 18, 1998.

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